Comic Browser:

#1
#2
#3
#4
#5
#6
#7
#8
#9
#10
Selector

Age of Ultron #3: Review

Mar 2013
Brian Michael Bendis, Bryan Hitch

Story Name:

(no title given)

Review & Comments

Rating:
4.5 stars

Age of Ultron #3 Review by (March 31, 2013)
In Superior Spider-Man #6AU we find the answer to a question I posed last time. It's the Otto Octavius Spider-Man we've got here. The story takes place in the middle of AoU#3, between the decision to send Luke and She-Hulk into Ultron's den and the actual execution of the plan. Here Tony Stark recruits Spidey and Quicksilver for another scheme that may make Jen's sacrifice unnecessary. Back when he was Director of SHIELD he created devices that could be used to send an area into the Negative Zone. But he needs some Neg Zone tech to control it. With the Baxter Building gone the only such tech he knows about is in Horizon Labs where Peter worked. Quicksilver rushes to surround Ultron's HQ with Stark's devices while Spidey goes to get the Neg Zone tech. But Ock figures he's cleverer than Stark. He uses his ubiquitous Spider Eye devices to take over Ultron robots and use them to invade Ultron's HQ, intending to replace him as the (benevolent) ruler of the world. But what he finds isn't Ultron (but we don't see clearly what it *is* until AoU#3). The real Ultron takes back control of his drones, and Spider-Man has to retreat, and return to the others without the Neg Zone tech. Stark is understanding, because Quicksilver reported the massing of Ultrons. And Doc Ock learns the true value of teamwork. (But obviously not enough to tell them it's not Ultron in the HQ.) I can combine 2 comments in one here. We don't know exactly where in the career of Spider-Ock this fits. But if it follows the real #6, then the Avengers have put behind them the fact that they decided to throw Spidey off the team at the end of that issue. Also there's no sign of the 'ghost' of Peter in Otto's head in this issue. Otto thinks he recognises the figure at the heart of Ultron's HQ as the one that rendered him unconscious in flashback last issue. But this silhouette with missing legs doesn't look like the cloaked form then. Maybe that flashback figure was the drone in

I got cocky again and tried to put too much in a comment box. The last sentence in the following box should be:- Maybe that flashback figure was the drone in Doom's cloak from the FF issue?

In that issue the FF, far away in space and time, get a chronostellar radio message from Black Panther telling them how bad it is on Earth, and it's all hands to the pumps. The situation is so dire that the FF leave their kids behind in their (intelligent) spaceship, and take a shuttle through a space-time-warp back home. They arrive at what remains of the Baxter Building to find Medusa dead, and the rest of the Future Foundation missing and probably dead also. The 3 male members are quickly overwhelmed and killed by a horde of Ultron robots, 1 of which wears Dr Doom's cape and mask. Only Invisible Woman escapes, buried under rubble. She is dug out 3 days later by She-Hulk (presumably the only surviving member of the Future Foundation). Which is why they both are present in the current series. (But I'm still convinced I see Thing's head on one of the bunk beds in #1.) This 1st tie-in still leaves us with the question of how exactly it fits in the current FF sequence. The FF have been travelling in space-time for several issues, ans will continue to do so. The normal #5 doesn't end with any lead-in to #5AU. The FF will be back in space in #6, and I doubt there'll be a scene where they say to the kids "Hi! We're back! Than goodness that Ultron thing's over!" Not to mention 3 of them are dead. This just reinforces the idea that the Age of Ultron will have to wipe itself out in a time paradox.

This Event is more user-friendly than most in that it has few tie-ins. But it is unlikely that I'll put them on the database. Partly because their #nAU numbering would make it awkward. A problem that my comic-shop guy tells me also affects Diamond's ordering form. So for instance this month's Fantastic Four #5 and #5AU were both just listed as #5. He says it's not just AU that's not catered for. They haven't even got round to handling decimal points yet. So May's Iron Man #258.1-4 are just 4 different #258's. (I may be overmaligning Diamond here. It may just be a problem with Diamond UK here in Britain.) However, the tie-ins will be so few I can easily summarise them in my comments to AoU itself. Anyway there were 2 tie-ins this month, and because FF#5AU was late they've both come out this week.

The tie-ins that have started coming out confirm that this series is happening at the current Marvel time. But is it in the real Marvel timeline? In so then it's a wonder no-one comments on Emma Frost being one of the mutant 'terrorist' Uncanny X-Men. But I suppose a disaster like this makes for strange bedfellows. Taskmaster is less unlikely. Although most often a villain, he's dabbled on the side of good occasionally. Eg being an instructor for the Initiative (before Norman Osborn took over). And in the current Secret Avengers he's a SHIELD mole in AIM. We don't see Dr Strange and Quicksilver among the NY team this issue. Earlier writers have said that Ultron was built to *really* have emotions, but that it focussed on hating it's 'father'.



 

Synopsis / Summary / Plot

Age of Ultron #3 Synopsis by Rob Johnson
Ultron took over the world and trashed it a few days ago. Last issue we learned that it happened overnight (at least that was the time in New York).

This issue we continue following the band of heroes in New York, but we also take a look at another ruined US city. Last time it was Black Widow and Moon Knight in San Francisco. This time it's Black Panther, Red Hulk and Taskmaster on a rooftop in Chicago.

Taskmaster uses high-powered binoculars to scope out an Ultron robot 1.2 miles away. He gives Red Hulk the location. Rulk leaps and lands on the robot, tearing its head off. Then he leaps back to his companions with the head.

But he's not quick enough, and he's followed by more Ultrons. Rulk tosses the head to Panther and Taskmaster, and holds off the robots while they escape. Unfortunately a stray blast sends the other 2 tumbling down a stairwell. Panther breaks his neck, leaving Taskmaster to flee with their prize.

Back in the ruins of New York, Spider-Man is trying to get the other heroes motivated. But losing some of their heavy-hitters like Cyclops, Hulk, Thing and Thor (all supposedly before #1) has them dispirited. And Luke Cage lost his wife Jessica and their baby.

But Captain America reminds them of what they learned from Spider-Man last issue, after Hawkeye rescued him from Hammerhead and Owl in #1. For some reason Ultron is willing to play favourites with people who bring him heroes, dead or alive. Tony Stark thinks it's because Ultron has programmed twisted 'emotions' into itself, so that it doesn't just want to wipe out mankind, it wants to make them suffer. Especially the heroes that opposed it.

Hawkeye vents his anger at the absent Hank Pym for creating Ultron long ago. Tony tries to defend him, but Barton reminds Stark how he blamed Clint for risking their exposure by rescuing Spider-Man - Pym's action had much worse consequences.

Cap brings the discussion back to the important topic of what to do now. He suggests they give Ultron what he wants, to get someone inside his stronghold.

The 'victim' should be someone who can take punishment. Luke Cage and She-Hulk both volunteer. Jennifer wins the argument, and Luke offers to be the 'seller'. Wolverine wants in, but Cap says they don't want adamantium Ultron to get his hands on more of the metal from Logan's skeleton.

Cap figures it won't be safe to stay where they are once Jen and Luke are in Ultron's hands. They'll go to the Mutate village in the Savage Land, and the other other 2 can join them there if they make it out.

Cage and She-Hulk go out into the open, and Luke knocks Jen out (The blow causes several unstable building to collapse.) Then he carries her over his shoulder. Soon he attracts some Ultron robots, and he says he wants to trade. The robots lead him to a futuristic building in the heart of NY. Cage carries She-Hulk inside, where he finds that he isn't facing Ultron. Instead it's Vision with his lower half missing.


Share This Page


Elektra

> Age of Ultron: Book info and issue index

Loading cover...

::: click cover to ENLARGE it :::


Bryan Hitch
Paul Neary
Paul Mounts
Bryan Hitch (Cover Penciler)
Paul Neary (Cover Inker)
Paul Mounts (Cover Colorist)
Letterer: Cory Petit.
Editor: Lauren Sankovitch.

Characters

Listed in Alphabetical Order.

Beast
Beast

(Hank McCoy)
Black Panther
Black Panther

(T'Challa)
Black Widow
Black Widow

(Natasha Romanoff)
Captain America
Captain America

(Steve Rogers)
Hawkeye
Hawkeye

(Clint Barton)
Hulk
Hulk

(Bruce Banner)
Invisible Woman
Invisible Woman

(Sue Storm)
Iron Fist
Iron Fist

(Danny Rand)
Iron Man
Iron Man

(Tony Stark)
Luke Cage
Luke Cage

(Power Man)
Red Hulk
Red Hulk

(Thunderbolt Ross)
She-Hulk
She-Hulk

(Jennifer Walters)
Spider-Man
Spider-Man

(Peter Parker)
Thing
Thing

(Ben Grimm)
Thor
Thor

(Odinson)
Valkyrie
Valkyrie

(Brunnhilda)
Wolverine
Wolverine

(James Howlett)

Plus: Emma Frost, Photon (Monica Rambeau), Quake (Daisy Johnson), Spider-Man (Otto Octavius), Taskmaster.