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Invincible Iron Man #60: Review

Jul 1973
Mike Friedrich, George Tuska

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Story Name:

Cry Marauder!

Review & Comments

Rating:
3 stars

Invincible Iron Man #60 Review by (October 22, 2013)
Review: Let’s face it: the Masked Marauder is not a very interesting villain. He did fairly well against the unpowered Daredevil, plus there was the mystery of his true identity. But he is no match for Iron Man, being just a loudmouthed mastermind with a ray gun in his goggles. And no one cares about his secret identity anymore. So we can just go along with him defeating Iron Man because the writer wanted this story to cover two issues but what is there to interest us? Surely not the Pepper and Happy soap opera? No. What is interesting is Marvel’s attempt to mirror the times and the shifting social attitudes toward the Vietnam War. When Iron Man was introduced, the war was fairly well supported and so a hero who supplied weapons for the military was acceptable as everyone recalled World War 2 and the fight against tyranny. As the Vietnam conflict wore on, attitudes changed and the war was increasingly unpopular, especially among the younger generation (you know, those of draft age). So Marvel was stuck with a protagonist who (possibly) provided the weapons used to kill non-combatants and this is how they addressed it: Tony is denounced by Roxanne Gilbert and her nurse—and he ends up brooding over doing what he thought was right at the time. The movie took a different tack: with these anti-military sentiments in place for decades, Downey’s Tony Stark had to be portrayed as arrogant and morally obtuse until he got a first-hand look at the devastation he was causing. That was another way to handle it, but in 1973 the issue was fresher in everyone’s mind and Marvel had to walk a fine line to avoid having their hero turn villain (or pacifist) overnight.

Comments: Part one of two. The Masked Marauder was introduced as a foe of Spider-Man and Daredevil in DAREDEVIL #16-19. He was apparently killed in DD #27 when he fell into a disintegrator field; here we learn that the disintegrator field was really a teleportation device and he got away safely.




 

Synopsis / Summary / Plot

Invincible Iron Man #60 Synopsis by T Vernon
The Masked Marauder leads his henchmen on a raid of Stark Industries Aerospace Division. Object: to hijack Stark’s new space shuttle in a plan to ransom it back to Stark. They board the craft and fly it though the wall and away….
In his office, Tony Stark broods over the injury done to Roxanne Gilbert last issue. He tries to visit her in the hospital but she has left orders to turn him away as the pacifist Roxanne wants nothing to do with a man who makes weapons. Depressed, he asks Pepper Potts to accompany him to a nightclub, hoping to cheer up—unaware that she has just had a fight with husband Happy Hogan over her long hours. While moping at the club, Tony receives the call that his space shuttle has been stolen and makes a hasty exit. Suiting up as Iron Man, he takes off in pursuit of the craft. Spying the hero on their tail, the Masked Marauder orders a landing on a deserted highway. There, Iron Man battles the henchmen who are armed with laser guns and Steele, who is clad in armor. The hero defeats them handily and faces the boss. Iron Man, hampered by the discovery that there are innocent bystanders nearby, is distracted long enough for the Marauder to hit him with an Opti-Blast and a laser shot that knock the hero cold. The villain gloats as he carries off his captive….

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Hideth #1 comic

George Tuska
Mickey Demeo
Petra Goldberg
John Romita (Cover Penciler)
John Romita (Cover Inker)
Letterer: Denise Wohl.
Editor: Roy Thomas.

Characters

Listed in Alphabetical Order.

Iron Man
Iron Man

(Tony Stark)
Pepper Potts
Pepper Potts

(Pepper Hogan)

Plus: Happy Hogan, Masked Marauder, Roxanne Gilbert.

> Invincible Iron Man: Book info and issue index

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